© NASA

What are we looking at when we look into the skies? ‒ The 5th episode of From The Moon

July 22, 2021

In this episode we are going to reverse the telescope, and instead focusing our gaze on our home planet, we are going to stay on Earth and look out into space; taking this opportunity to look at our imaginary host, the Moon, and far beyond that too.

Simon Delalande from Unsplash

Mia Fineman

"There's always a mystery associated with the moon, because there's always a side of the moon that we can't see."

Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz works with a grapple fixture during extravehicular activity to perform work on the International Space Station © NASA
Astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz works with a grapple fixture during extravehicular activity to perform work on the International Space Station © NASA

What are we looking at when we look into the skies? What is myth and what is scientific fact? This episode is going to be the very definition of multi-disciplinary ‒ we’ll be hearing from an astronaut and an astrophysicist ‒ as well as an artist, and a curator of photography. David’s first guest occupies a place within a very select group of humans ‒ those who have actually been into space. Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli shares with us how this extraordinary experience was from both a physical and psychological perspective. As we discover on the episode, looking (or going) into space is often a process of considering our own planet’s position within it, theoretical astrophysicist Dr.Katie Mack puts us on the right path and gives us an introduction to astronomy.

SPOILER ALERT: Did you know the Moon is leaving us? 

Next, choreographer, artist and author Ivan Muller takes us through some of the many mythical, mystical and mind-related associations that the Moon has in a cultural context. Introducing a lunar visual history is curator of photography at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Mia Fineman, who charts how humans began to visualise and capture the moon only very recently. Ending our journey into space, James Carpenter of the European Space Agency - attempts to swerve the conversion back to science, although as he explains, space exploration and geo-politics are so often intertwined.

Ivana Muller

"We can't really fully and truly grasp the moon and understand it, even though it's just there every single night."

Ivana Muller
Ivana Muller
Katie Mack © Nerissa Escanlar
Katie Mack © Nerissa Escanlar
Paolo Nespoli

"We are using resources in a way that doesn't take into account the future and looking at Earth from space, this becomes apparent."

Paolo Nespoli © ESA Stephane Corvaja
Paolo Nespoli © ESA Stephane Corvaja
Mia Fineman
Mia Fineman
James Carpenter
James Carpenter

Credits

Host: David Plaisant
Sound editor: Alex Portfelix
Soundtrack: Jon Arnold dei Super Drama
Production Triennale Milano: Marco Martello, Gabriele Savioli

Related events

Related articles

We remind that at the entrance of Triennale Milano you will be required to show the Green Pass together with an identity document.

Visit Triennale in safety
Sitemap